Council Districts and Candidates at a Glance

The following outline the 10 City Council districts and list declared candidates (which is to say, those people who say specifically that they are running as of January 26. We will add more as additional candidates declare). We will also provide a list of declared candidates for the seven at-large Council seats, which are elected city-wide, not by district. We are also providing brief profiles of the candidates (click on the highlighted names to see the information). We will post the profiles as we receive the information from candidates. If you are a Council candidate and wish to be included, please contact us at the phone number given below.

Contents


District 1
District 2
District 3
District 4
District 5
District 6
District 7
District 8
District 9
District 10
At Large Candidates




District 1


Overview


During the last Council elections in 2007, the prospect of two casinos on the Delaware River waterfront was the hottest issue in the First Council District. Four years later, SugarHouse casino is up and running in Fishtown. And the fate of South Philadelphia’s Foxwoods casino is still up in the air after the State Gaming Control Board yanked its license in December 2010.

The First district hugs the Delaware River, but for decades there’s been no unconditional love for any initiative floated to develop the waterfront. Plan after plan has failed or been killed by opponents, leaving the strip between Penn’s Landing and South Philadelphia without a clear direction for the future. Philadelphia lags far behind other cities that have built thriving waterfront complexes to attract tourism, create jobs, stimulate spending and generate critically needed tax revenue. A $5 million grant from The William Penn Foundation in January 2011 should help bring some waterfront projects to completion. The only other publicly acknowledged development plan involves rehabilitating the USS United States, the aging passenger liner docked at Penn’s Landing since 1996.

But waterfront development is just one of many issues facing the First district. Crime, drugs and urban blight continue to erode sections of the First District and scar its residents. Changes in the ethnic make up of South Philadelphia are still creating tensions in its once predominantly Italian neighborhoods.

Major Neighborhoods

Port Richmond, Fishtown, Northern Liberties, Olde City, Chinatown, Society Hill, Queen Village, Bella Vista, Pennsport, parts of South Philadelphia and Center City  and much of the city’s Delaware River waterfront.
 

For a map, please click here.
For District 1 Candidate Campaign Finance data, please click here.


INCUMBENT

Frank DiCicco has served as Council’s First District representative since his election in 1995.  The Councilman has decided he will not run for re-election.

Announced Candidates

Vern Anastasio (D)
Joe Grace (D)
Jeff Hornstein (D)
Lou Lanni (R)


*The incumbent has not officially declared, but has indicated that he is running for reelection.

Potential Candidates

Mark Squilla (D)

Are you a candidate in the First District? Would you like to complete Seventy's brief candidate profile to be posted here? Please contact Luke McKinstry at (215) 557-3600, Ext. 112.

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District 2


OVERVIEW

The Second Council District stretches from Center City south and west to the Delaware County line; in between lies the sports complex, Navy Yard, Philadelphia International Airport, and the working class communities of South and Southwest Philadelphia, with a growing influx of Asian and Hispanic immigrants. Tough economic times, the erosion of the city’s industrial base, crime, drugs and decay have hit a number of these neighborhoods hard. There is some optimism based, in part, on the planned development of “Philly Live!,” the $100 million dollar project designed to link South Philly’s three stadiums with stores, restaurants and entertainment venues. Developers are aiming for a 2012 completion date.  In addition to erecting a new destination hot spot, the project should create and sustain hundred of jobs over time that are critical for the economic well being of the district and the City.

Despite development like Philly Live! and the spate of new companies establishing residence at the Navy Yard complex, the challenge in the Second District continues to be managing and improving the quality of life in a string of diverse communities - no easy task in an era when race, ethnicity and politics are too often intertwined.

MAJOR NEIGHBORHOODS

Parts of South and Southwest Philadelphia and Center City, including portions of Rittenhouse Square East and West, the Stadiums complex, Navy Yard, Grays Ferry, Point Breeze, Girard Estate and Elmwood Park.

For a map, please click here.
For District 2 Candidate Campaign Finance data, Please Click Here.


INCUMBENT

City Council President Anna Verna is almost synonymous with the Second District. She has served its constituents for more than three decades; she was elected in 1975 and became Council’s first woman president in 1999. She announced on January 24 that she will not seek reelection and will retire from public office at the end of her current term.

ANNOUNCED CANDIDATES

Richard DeMarco (D)
Kenyatta Johnson (D)

Damon K. Roberts (D)

POTENTIAL CANDIDATES

Louis Borda (D)
Barbara Capozzi (D)

Vincent DeFino (D)

Are you a candidate in the Second District? Would you like to complete Seventy's brief candidate profile to be posted here? Please contact Luke McKinstry at (215) 557-3600, Ext. 112. We are posting these profiles in the order we receive the information from the candidates.

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District 3


Overview

The Third Council District is a study in contrasts. It encompasses Southwest and West Philadelphia and all of University City. Even with restraints imposed by a shaky economy, development along the Market Street corridor has been steady, with the University of Pennsylvania and Drexel University carrying out ambitious expansion plans to link West Philly with Center City and major construction going on at Children’s Hospital and the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. 

Community investment has helped revitalize some adjacent residential areas; urban professionals have gentrified others, but there are still too many West Philly streets dotted by crumbling homes and struggling small businesses. Crime and drugs remain a significant problem in large pockets of the Third. The challenge is balancing the need to address quality of life issues and the demands of long-time residents against the needs of revenue and status-producing institutions that generate jobs and prestige for the city.

Construction of the new “Youth Study Center (YSC),” the facility for troubled youths, at 48th Street and Haverford Avenue tops the list of major non-university development projects. Community activists spent years fighting plans to relocate the YSC – which needed to be moved to clear ground for the new Barnes Museum on the Ben Franklin Parkway. They only backed down after receiving promises to fund a number of District improvement projects, including a Recreation Center named after incumbent Jannie Blackwell’s late husband (and predecessor on Council): Lucien Blackwell. 

MAJOR NEIGHBORHOODS

Parts of Southwest Philadelphia, Mantua, Bartram Gardens, Cobbs Creek, Spruce Hill, Powelton Village and University City

For a map, please click here.
For district 3 candidate campaign finance data, please click here.


INCUMBENT

Jannie Blackwell has represented the Third district since 1991 – taking over for her late husband, Lucien Blackwell.

ANNOUNCED CANDIDATES

Jannie Blackwell (D)*
Alicia Burbage (D)

*The incumbent has not officially declared, but has indicated that she is running for reelection.

POTENTIAL CANDIDATES

Tony Dphax King (D)

Are you a candidate in the Third District? Would you like to complete Seventy's brief candidate profile to be posted here? Please contact Luke McKinstry at (215) 557-3600, Ext. 112. We are posting these profiles in the order we receive the information from the candidates.

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District 4


Overview

Divided by the Schuylkill River but generally united by a commitment to economic development, Philadelphia’s Fourth Council District is a patchwork of well-established neighborhoods and home to some of the city’s most active community development corporations and neighborhood associations.

The Fourth District includes an eclectic mix of ethnic and working class families and a growing number of young professionals and artists. It includes major business and residential corridors along parts of City Line Avenue, Ridge Avenue, Main Street and Henry Avenue. Saint Joseph’s University and Philadelphia University bookend its boundaries. There are quality of life, business development, and housing issues in a number of neighborhoods and plenty of opposition to selected development from residents of East Falls.

In a story that’s not yet concluded, the city and the state dedicated close to $11 million in 2008 to establish a temporary home for the Youth Studies Center (YSC) at the former Eastern Pennsylvania Psychiatric Institute (EPPI) on Henry Avenue before moving to a still-to-be-constructed site in West Philadelphia. East Falls’ activists contend relocation of both the YSC and a drug treatment facility to EPPI has delayed development of prime commercial real estate along the Henry Avenue corridor.

MAJOR NEIGHBORHOODS

Wynnefield, Wynnefield Heights, Overbrook, Manayunk, East Falls, Roxborough 

For a map, please click here.
for district 4 candidate campaign finance data, please click here.


INCUMBENT

The Fourth district is represented in Council by Curtis Jones, Jr., who was elected in 2007.  

ANNOUNCED CANDIDATES

Curtis Jones, Jr. (D)

POTENTIAL CANDIDATES


Are you a candidate in the Fourth District? Would you like to complete Seventy's brief candidate profile to be posted here? Please contact Luke McKinstry at (215) 557-3600, Ext. 112. We are posting these profiles in the order we receive the information from the candidates.

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District 5


Overview

The City’s Fifth Council District is all about promise and problems. It includes some of the City’s grandest buildings and some of its most decayed housing. There has been strong and noticeable growth around Temple University’s Broad Street locations, in Northern Liberties, and in parts of Fairmount. The success of the South Broad Street corridor has prompted ambitions to accomplish the same residential and commercial growth on North Broad Street (from City Hall to Erie Avenue). However, areas just a few blocks from Broad Street in the district continue to have quality of life issues, gun violence, and drugs problems that must be addressed. 

Two projects along the Benjamin Franklin Parkway will add to the district’s allure. The first is the Barnes Museum, which will be completed in late 2011 after court battles to keep the international showpiece in its Merion home. Barnes will also have a new nearby neighbor – a new Mormon temple. After overcoming legal and zoning hurdles, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints won approval to build its new $70 million temple at 18th and Vine Streets. The 68,000-square-foot building topped by two massive spires is expected to create hundreds of local construction jobs. City and church officials anticipate hundreds of thousands of annual visits to the site when it is completed in 2013.

MAJOR NEIGHBORHOODS

North Central Philadelphia, Strawberry Mansion, Lower Hunting Park, Ludlow, Yorktown, West Poplar, Fairhill, Brewerytown, Francisville, Spring Garden, Fairmount, Logan Square, and parts of Northwood, Fishtown, Northern Liberties, and Center City

For a map, please click here.
for district 5 candidate campaign finance information, please click here.


INCUMBENT

Councilman Darrell Clarke was elected in 1999 to succeed his mentor and former boss, longtime Fifth District Council member and Council President John F. Street, who was elected mayor during the same election. Clarke is Council's majority whip.   

ANNOUNCED CANDIDATES

Darrell Clarke (D)*
Suzanne Carn (D)

*The incumbent has not officially declared, but has indicated that he is running for reelection.

POTENTIAL CANDIDATES

James Royal (D)

Are you a candidate in the Fifth District? Would you like to complete Seventy's brief candidate profile to be posted here? Please contact Luke McKinstry at (215) 557-3600, Ext. 112. We are posting these profiles in the order we receive the information from the candidates.

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District 6


Overview

Historically working class, white, ethnically Irish and Polish, with a large population of city workers, most neighborhoods in the Sixth District have remained relatively stable compared to other parts of the city. Over time, the Oxford Circle section of the district has absorbed several waves of Russian and Eastern European immigrants and is home to one of the largest Orthodox Jewish communities in the city. The Hispanic population continues to grow in some neighborhoods, and more Asian and African American residents are now moving into the area.

With the exception of a planned supermarket complex on the grounds of the former Frankford Arsenal, the lower Northeast has seen little major economic development of late; however, its commercial corridors, populated by small store-front or service-oriented businesses, have survived the economic downturn without suffering dramatic losses. Along with continuing efforts to hold onto existing businesses, while attracting new ones compatible with the city’s changing economic base, Sixth District residents also need to maintain a close check on crime and quality of life issues.

MAJOR NEIGHBORHOODS

East of Roosevelt Boulevard: Tacony, Mayfair, Holmesburg, Pennypack, Bridesburg, Wissinoming

For a map, please click here.
for district 6 candidate campaign finance data, please click here.


INCUMBENT

Change is certain in the Sixth: After more than three decades Joan Krajewski, whose official website says she’s the “Queen of Constituent Service,” is resigning from Council. This time she seems to mean it. In 2007, Krajewski ran for reelection, “retired” for 24 hours to collect her $297,466 DROP retirement payment and then returned to work to start her 8th term.

ANNOUNCED CANDIDATES

Martin Bednarek (D)
Bob Henon (D)
Sandra Stewart (R)

POTENTIAL CANDIDATES


Are you a candidate in the Sixth District? Would you like to complete Seventy's brief candidate profile to be posted here? Please contact Luke McKinstry at (215) 557-3600, Ext. 112. We are posting these profiles in the order we receive the information from the candidates.

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District 7


Overview

In 2001, the Seventh District was the star in the battle to redraw district boundaries based on the Census. Ten years (and several council members) later, it’s likely the Seventh District will make redistricting headlines again. The increasingly Hispanic district has had challenges over the last decade, ranging from a lack of city services to decaying homes, businesses, and recreation areas, to an increase in crime and drug trafficking.

The biggest problem in the district of late has been the case of the “Kensington strangler,” who as of mid-January 2011 had killed three women and caused great fear and unrest in a neighborhood that is trying to stage an economic revival. Although police arrested a suspect on Jan. 17, the case highlighted the rough edge of life in the neighborhood, with a subculture of drug abuse and violence.

Frankford, in particular, has undergone a number of changes. Parts of Frankford Avenue, the community’s once prime shopping corridor, have been pinched by demographic shifts and economic uncertainty. However, Frankford residents are especially upset by the unprecedented number of homes for recovering addicts and recently released inmates cropping up in their community. According to a state representative quoted in a recently published report, there are at least 150 halfway houses within a two mile radius of his Frankford Avenue office. The neighborhood’s large, single-family homes, affordable real estate, and easy zoning make it relatively easy to set up shop. Residents say their unwanted new neighbors are not only disruptive, but responsible for increased crime in the area. From Kensington to Hunting Park, quality of life, crime, housing and business development will remain pressing issues in the Seventh for years to come.

MAJOR NEIGHBORHOOD:

Hunting Park, parts of North Philadelphia, Kensington, Frankford, Juniata Park, Feltonville

For a map, please click here.
for district 7 candidate campaign finance data, please click here.


INCUMBENT

The Seventh district is represented by first-term incumbent and Council’s first Latina, Maria Quiñones Sánchez – who is part of the active “freshmen” bloc of Curtis Jones (Fourth district) and Bill Green (Democrat at-large).

ANNOUNCED CANDIDATES

Maria Quiñones Sánchez (D)

POTENTIAL CANDIDATES

Daniel Savage (D)

Are you a candidate in the Seventh District? Would you like to complete Seventy's brief candidate profile to be posted here? Please contact Luke McKinstry at (215) 557-3600, Ext. 112. We are posting these profiles in the order we receive the information from the candidates.

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District 8


Overview

The Eighth Council District is a patchwork of racially diverse communities with very different characteristics and challenges. Their common denominator is community development and economic growth. Tackling this is especially important in the Nicetown-Tioga section, where the empty shells of former industrial sites still await full re-purposing. Some progress has been made, but this section of Hunting Park Avenue and its adjacent neighborhoods are still battling the effects of lost industry, crime, and urban decay. The promise of development has not been fully realized in Germantown either.

The economic downturn and unemployment have taken a significant toll on parts of the community. The recent collapse of once-powerful 126-year community development and service organization Germantown Settlement, amid allegations of severe mismanagement, has compounded the problem. Chestnut Hill and Mt. Airy are facing economic problems, too. A number of businesses on the upper end of Germantown Avenue in Chestnut Hill – one of the city’s most affluent areas – have closed or moved, leaving sporadic vacancies along the Avenue. Easily accessible big box and mall shopping in the suburbs haven’t helped the situation; neither did the Germantown Avenue reconstruction project, which dragged on far longer than most resident and businesses anticipated. Germantown Avenue in Mt. Airy is seeing a revival, with new restaurants and shops. The challenge for whoever wins the Eighth will be stabilizing these neighborhoods in the context of a still recovering economy and an overburdened city budget.  

MAJOR NEIGHBORHOODS:

Germantown, Logan, Nicetown, Tioga, Ogontz, parts of Hunting Park, Mt. Airy, Chestnut Hill

For a map, please click here.
for district 8 candidate campaign finance data, please click here.


INCUMBENT

Donna Reed Miller, who has represented the Eighth District since 1995, made a surprise announcement on January 14: She will not run for reelection.

ANNOUNCED CANDIDATES

Cindy Bass (D)
Anita Hamilton (D)

Greg Paulmier (D)
Verna Tyner (D)


POTENTIAL CANDIDATES

Irv Ackelsberg (D)
Jerry Brown (D)
Latrice Bryant (D)
Jordan Dillard (D)
Donna Gentile O'Donnell (D)
Andrew Lofton (D)


Are you a candidate in the Eighth District? Would you like to complete Seventy's brief candidate profile to be posted here? Please contact Luke McKinstry at (215) 557-3600, Ext. 112. We are posting these profiles in the order we receive the information from the candidates.

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District 9


Overview

For more than three decades, a large part of the Ninth Council District has been all about new wave. Not the music, but of Philadelphia’s immigrant population. Once home to German and Irish working class families, the District is now one of the most diverse in the city. Olney’s Fifth Street shopping corridor tells the story of the district’s relative success in absorbing new groups of immigration into its communities. Once exclusively populated by white business owners, Fifth Street has seen African-American, Korean, and Hispanic shop owners fill the void left by those who fled the city for the suburbs.

But perhaps the greatest recent shock to hit both former and current Olney residents was the Archdiocese’s decision to shut down Cardinal Dougherty High School in June 2010 due to plummeting enrollment and shifting demographics. At one time Dougherty was the largest parochial school in the city - some claim it was the largest parochial school in the world. But that was back in the Sixties. .
While the Ninth district has many assets, there are also concerns about quality of life, falling property values, and crime. Two of the six slain police officers whose murders rocked the city between 2006 and 2009 were assigned to and gunned down in the police district located within the boundaries of the Ninth. The areas around the Olney and Fern Rock Transportation Centers are ongoing hot spots for crime, and residents who live in Lawncrest and in neighborhoods around Rising Sun Avenue say the overall quality of life in their communities is deteriorating. Constituents expect these issues to be addressed; the problem for Council and the mayor is finding the money to do so.

MAJOR NEIGHBORHOODS:

Cedarbrook, East and West Oak Lane, Fern Rock, Melrose Park, Crescentville, Summerdale, Lawndale

For a map, please click here.
for district 9 candidate campaign finance data, please click here.


INCUMBENT

Councilwoman Marian Tasco, who is also Council’s Majority Leader, has represented the Ninth district since 1988.  She is widely said to be interested in a run for Council President, even assuming current President Anna Verna remains in Council.   

ANNOUNCED CANDIDATES

Marian Tasco (D)*

*The incumbent has not officially declared, but has indicated that she is running for reelection.

POTENTIAL CANDIDATES


Are you a candidate in the Ninth District? Would you like to complete Seventy's brief candidate profile to be posted here? Please contact Luke McKinstry at (215) 557-3600, Ext. 112. We are posting these profiles in the order we receive the information from the candidates.

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District 10


Overview

The Tenth Council district is generally identified with the neighborhoods surrounding the upper part of Roosevelt Boulevard. Words like “gentrification” and “revitalization” aren’t traditionally associated with the Far Northeast as frequently as words like “conservative” and “stable.” The area faces issues related to its older demographic, economic uncertainty, and unemployment. Many Northeast residents are vocal advocates for their neighborhoods and express concern about quality of life issues related to increasing crime.

The Northeast has more than its share of strip malls and shopping centers. A major issue has been whether to rezone the vacated IRS complex on the Boulevard to accommodate another mega-shopping area.  The more than 5,000 federal employees who worked at the facility have been relocated to the government’s refurbished site at 30th Street Station. The move means fewer people to spend valuable dollars in the area on a daily basis.

For now at least, the renowned Fox Chase Cancer Center, the second largest employer in Northeast Philadelphia, will not be carrying out its $1 billion expansion plans into adjacent Burlholme Park. So far, threats to move outside the city haven’t materialized. A new Women’s Cancer Center opened in September 2010 and Ed Rendell directed $8 million in renovation dollars in his last days as Pennsylvania’s Governor. 

In the meantime, Tenth District constituents will likely demand continued improvements for neighborhood playgrounds and recreation centers, as well as street repair and crime reduction.

MAJOR NEIGHBORHOODS:

Northeast Philadelphia, Fox Chase, Somerton, Bustleton, Torresdale, Parkwood, Pennypack Woods 

For a map, please click here.
for district 10 candidate campaign finance information, please click here.


INCUMBENT

Brian O’Neill, Council’s Minority Leader and its only GOP district member, was first elected in 1979. The Tenth District has the highest concentration of registered Republicans in the city.

ANNOUNCED CANDIDATES

Brian O’Neill (R)*

*The incumbent has not officially declared, but has indicated that he is running for reelection.

POTENTIAL CANDIDATES

Bill Rubin (D)

Are you a candidate in the Tenth District? Would you like to complete Seventy's brief candidate profile to be posted here? Please contact Luke McKinstry at (215) 557-3600, Ext. 112. We are posting these profiles in the order we receive the information from the candidates.

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At-Large Candidates


City Council’s seven at-large members represent the entire city, rather than a “Council district.”

As we described in our recent IN THE KNOW, the Philadelphia Home Rule Charter, the city’s “constitution,” permits no more than five at-large Council members from one political party. Two seats are guaranteed for members of a non-majority party. Although the GOP is currently a non-majority party in Philadelphia, this does not mean that the Repubicans are guaranteed two seats. One or two of the guaranteed non-majority seats can be won by independent or minority party candidates.  

Here is how the seven at-large Council members are chosen: The Democratic and Republican parties will each field candidates in the May 17 municipal primary. Typically, there are many candidates vying for each party’s nomination – and 2011 promises to be no different.

The five Democratic candidates who get the most primary votes will face the five Republican candidates who get the most primary votes in the November 8 general election. Independent and minority party candidates can also run for at-large seats if they qualify for the ballot.

The top seven vote-getters on November 8 will become at-large Council members for the next four years.

INCUMBENTS

There are currently five at-large Democrats and two at-large Republicans. 

On the Democratic side: James Kenney is the longest-serving at-large Council member, having been elected in 1991. Next in seniority among the at-large members are W. Wilson Goode, Jr., the former mayor’s son, and Blondell Reynolds Brown, both of whom arrived in 1999. William Greenlee followed after he first won a special election in 2006 to fill the term of his longtime boss, at-large member David Cohen, and then won re-election in 2007. The last at-large Democrat to join Council’s ranks was Bill Green, another former mayor’s son, in 2007.

On the Republican side: Frank Rizzo, Jr. -- son of the former Police Commissioner and Mayor -- won his first bid for city office in 1995. Retiring Jack Kelly became an at-large member in 2005, but was well-known to Council from an earlier stint representing the Seventh District. Kelly will leave Council with his $405,438 DROP payment. 

For Campaign Finance data for at-large democrats, please click here.
for campaign finance data for at-large republicans, please click here.

 

ANNOUNCED CANDIDATES (Democrats)

Jesse Brown (D)
Casey Cherry (D)
Sherrie Cohen (D)
W. Wilson Goode Jr. (D)*
Bill Green (D)*
William Greenlee (D)*
James Kenney (D)*
Blondell Reynolds Brown (D)*

Andy Toy (D) 

Announced CANDIDATES (Republicans)

Joe McColgan (R)
Elmer Money (R)
David Oh (R)
Dennis O'Brien (R)
Frank Rizzo Jr. (R)
Al Taubenberger (R)

*These incumbents have not officially declared, but have indicated that they are running for reelection.

POTENTIAL CANDIDATES  (Democrats)

Lawrence Clark (D)
Mike Driscoll (D)
Christopher Hayes (D)
Janis E. Manson (D)
Isaiah Thomas (D)


Potential Candidates (republicans)

Tim Gerard (R)
John Giordano (R)
Marie Delany (R)
Adam Lang (R)
Steve Odabashian (R)

Are you a candidate for one of the At-Large seats? Would you like to complete Seventy's brief candidate profile to be posted here? Please contact Luke McKinstry at (215) 557-3600, Ext. 112. We are posting these profiles in the order we receive the information from the candidates.

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